The International Preschools Blog

IPS Moving-Up Ceremonies: Zoom Style!

A few of the esteemed members of the IPS graduating class of 2020!

The end of the 2019-2020 school year has arrived, and with it comes end-of-the-year ceremonies for our Red (2s), Green (3s), Pre-K (4s), and Junior K (4s/5s) classes.  Usually, this time of year brings parents and children together within the classrooms to celebrate this milestone together.  Unfortunately, COVID-19 derailed our plans…but not to worry, the teachers at The International Preschools provided its students with memorable events to close out this school year!

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IPS Specialty Teachers Go Remote, Too!

Our classroom teachers are not the only people to “go remote” at The International Preschools!  In early April, Ms. Talcott, Mr. Doug, and Ms. Peggy joined the Zoom movement by visiting and hosting their library, music, and movement classes respectively.  For fifteen minutes a week, the children welcome library, music, and movement classes into their homes, in an adjusted manner appropriate for remote learning.

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Caterpillars to Butterflies at IPS

Creating butterflies with coffee filters in Pre-K 1!

A spring curriculum tradition at The International Preschools is to learn about life cycles.  Every year, IPS teachers receive caterpillars and/or ladybug larvae and, through observation, watch these tiny animals transform into butterflies and ladybugs respectively.  Although COVID-19 has prevented us from maintaining this tradition in person, our crafty teachers were able to still take part in this amazing unit via Zoom (and their homes)!

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We Love IPS Mothers (and Fathers)!

Parents Day celebration at 86th Street!

In mid-May, The International Preschools celebrated the traditional Mother’s Day holiday.  While our 76th Street location honored mothers in a few different ways, the 86th Street location chose to commemorate “Parents Day” with the children and their families.

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WE LOVE IPS TEACHERS!

Green Room students love their teachers!

May 5th marked National Teacher Appreciation Day.  Here at The International Preschools, we like to think that are teachers are appreciated every day!  The fabulous IPS Parents Association, in honor of the immense amount of work that our teachers are preparing and executing every day via our Zoom sessions, decided to present the faculty by coordinating a special surprise…

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Earth Day is Every Day (Even Remotely!) at IPS!

Pre-K Earth Day art!

The International Preschools celebrated Earth Day on Wednesday, April 22nd.  Though we are weeks into our remote learning experience, the children were able to immerse themselves in the importance of reducing, reusing, and recycling…and taking care of the Earth…with the help of their amazing teachers!

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Inside a (Remote Learning) Classroom at IPS

A Pre-K class created the letter R (their “letter of the week”) using play dough during a recent Zoom session.

The International Preschools has entered its third week of remote learning.  Upon entering the classrooms, one might feel as if they are actually visiting a “brick and mortar” version of what you’d find at the 76th Street and 86th Street locations.  Our faculty has done a spectacular job of transmitting their teaching styles through technological devices while still keeping the student/teacher connections that make IPS so special.

When you enter an IPS remote learning classroom, you might see…

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IPS Remote Learning: Our (New) Adventure Begins!

Greetings via Zoom from 86th Street!

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, our play-based learning environment has taken on a new look.  After a two-week spring break, The International Preschools reopened on Monday, March 30th…online!  Every day, our Red (2s), Green (3s), Pre-K (4s), and Junior K (4s/5s) Rooms are logging into their technical devices and bringing the IPS curriculum into our (currently socially distant) homes.

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Encore: “A Train Analogy”

The following post originally was published in spring of 2019.  Enjoy!

As a parent to a three-and-a-half year old and an eight month old, one of the most difficult concepts to navigate is how to help your child when he/she is upset.  It pains me beyond words when my daughter or son is (seemingly) inconsolable. Adults use distraction techniques to help soothe themselves and avoid having to deal with unwanted feelings.  As an adult, I’ve learned to “compartmentalize” as a coping mechanism; that is, instead of being overwhelmed for weeks about an upcoming event, I’m able to shorten the anticipatory anxiety to occur only just before the experience.

Children, however, need to learn how to handle these difficult feelings not only with the support of their parents or caregivers, but also through the ability to self-soothe.  (This is a technique best learned, in my experience, when you are younger, rather than having to learn it as an adult!) . The only way to learn to self-soothe is to allow your child to experience all of the feelings in the moment:  sadness, despair, hysteria (on occasion), to name a few.  A few years ago, I was aghast when our beloved pediatrician suggested that we leave our (at the time) nine-month-old daughter in her crib, whether she was crying or not, for short amounts of time in order to teach her how to get herself to go to sleep.  After one or two nights of extreme upset (where I actually left the apartment, leaving my husband to hear the brunt of the tears), my daughter magically was able to go to sleep on her own.  Who would’ve thought that could happen?  Not me, even as an experienced teacher, but sure enough, it happened.

I recently read a blog post by Katie McLaughlin called, “The Train Analogy That Will Change How You See Your Crying Child.”  It reminded me of what our pediatrician told us, and how incredibly helpful it was to myself, my husband, and our daughter, despite the pain I may have felt at the time.  I’ve provided the link to the article for you all below, in hopes that it can help other parents and families.

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